• 2721 W 120th Ave, Unit A100, Westminster, CO 80234

  • Dog Vaccines

    • Rabies - All dogs and cats in Colorado that are 4 months old or older must be vaccinated against rabies. Dog and cat owners must ensure that their animals are vaccinated within 90 days after assuming ownership. Rabies is a viral infection that affects the brain and spinal cord and almost always results in fatality. This infection can be transmitted to humans. Rabies vaccine can be administered on either a one-year or three-year protocol. (Core vaccine)
    • Distemper - This is an airborne virus that may cause brain damage among other issues. There are different schedules to administer the vaccine to puppies or adult dogs. (Core vaccine)
    • Adenovirus, type 1 (canine hepatitis) - Spread through infected urine and feces, this disease can lead to severe liver disease and death.  There are different schedules to administer the vaccine to puppies or adult dogs. (Core vaccine)
    • Adenovirus, type 2 (kennel cough) - Spread through coughs and sneezes. There are different schedules to administer the vaccine to puppies or adult dogs. (Core vaccine)
    • Parvovirus - Most often seen in puppies, Parvovirus is extremely contagious and can quickly lead to death. There are different schedules to administer the vaccine to puppies or adult dogs. (Core vaccine)
    • Non-core vaccines include: Parainfluenza; Bordetella; Lyme Disease; Leptospirosis; and Canine Influenza.
  • Cat vaccines

    • Rabies - Rabies is  100% fatal to cats. See Vaccinations for dogs for further information. There are different schedules to administer the vaccine to kittens or adult cats. (Core vaccine)
    • Feline Distemper - This is an extremely contagious disease that commonly affects kittens and can cause death. There are different schedules to administer the vaccine to kittens or adult cats. (Core vaccine)
    • Feline Herpesvirus - This is another disease that causes a very contagious upper respiratory condition. There are different schedules to administer the vaccine to kittens or adult cats. (Core vaccine)
    • Calicivirus - A very contagious upper respiratory disease that can cause joint pain, fever, anorexia, and oral ulcerations. There are different schedules to administer the vaccine to kittens or adult cats. (Core vaccine)
    • Non-core vaccines include: Feline Leukemia Virus (FeLV) and Bordetella.
  • Parasite prevention and control

    Parasites can sap your pet's vitality and, in some cases, lead to death. Diagnosis and treatment varies and a discussion with your veterinarian will determine the best course of prevention for your pet. The most common parasites found in dogs and cats are:

    • Hookworms - Small, wire-like worms that attach to the small intestine and suck the animal's blood leading to anemia, weight loss, lethargy, and blood in the feces. Hookworms are more often seen in dogs than cats. Humans can acquire hookworms by contact with feces through bare feet or hands.
    • Roundworms - Roundworms infect the intestinal tract of both dogs and cats; in fact, most puppies and kittens are born with roundworm larvae already in their system. Roundworms can often be seen with the naked eye in pets’ vomit or stool, and active roundworm infestations will often give your pet a pot-bellied appearance. Like hookworms, roundworms are passed to humans through skin contact with infected feces or soil
    • Whipworms - Whipworms are more commonly found in dogs than in cats. They live in the animal’s large intestine and shed fewer eggs than other types of intestinal parasites so can be harder to detect from a stool sample. Dogs infected with whipworm often show no symptoms. The risk of humans contracting whipworms is very limited.
    • Tapeworms - Animals most often contract tapeworms from ingesting fleas infested with tapeworm eggs. The parasite sheds the terminal end of its tail which is detected in the animal’s stool or attached to the fur under the animal’s tail. Symptoms of tapeworm infestation are often heard to detect and include general itchiness around the anal area, butt scooting, weight loss without loss of appetite or increased appetite without weight gain, and a distended abdomen.
    • Giardiasis - Giardia is not a worm; rather, it’s a single-celled protozoan. The active form of the parasite lives in the intestine; the inactive form is encased in a hard shell (cysts) and can live outside of a host. Animals contract giardia by ingesting these cysts. Symptoms include vomiting, greasy or foul-smelling feces, and diarrhea. Young animals and animals under stress are more vulnerable to infection.
    • Heartworm - This parasite has historically been confined to the southern states in the U.S. However, it is becoming more common in Colorado. Heartworm disease is a serious disease that results in severe lung disease, heart failure, other organ damage, and death in pets, mainly dogs, cats, and ferrets. It is caused by a parasitic worm called Dirofilaria immitis. The worms are spread through the bite of a mosquito.  The worms mature into adults, mate, and produce offspring while living inside a dog. The worms are called “heartworms” because the adults live in the heart, lungs, and associated blood vessels of an infected animal. Cats can also be infested with heartworms although not to the extent of dogs.